Further thoughts on mathematical formalism in Economics

In a recent entry,  I offered a brief, and consequently simplified explanation of why formalism in mathematics and logic per se is not the cause of the perceived (accurately in my view) lack of realism in mainstream economics. This is not to say, however, that the emphasis in mainstream economics on formal mathematical is particularly … Continue reading Further thoughts on mathematical formalism in Economics

Conspiracy Theories and Academic Freedom: Part I.

I recently read about the case of Joy Karega, who was dismissed last fall from her tenure track position at Oberlin College for "intellectual dishonesty" in her Facebook posts (for a few more specifics on this case, see also here).  The initial objections to her Facebook posts stemmed from their allegedly anti-semitic character.  At least one of … Continue reading Conspiracy Theories and Academic Freedom: Part I.

Reforming Economics Education

There is a good deal of discussion these days about what is wrong with how economics is taught at the University level. For some examples, see Lars Syll's blog , The Institute for New Economic Thinking, and this recent article in VOX about controversies surrounding Greg Mankiw's Principles of Economics course and text and alternatives to it at Harvard. I've now completed the … Continue reading Reforming Economics Education

Why Centrist Democrats are Wrong

In a recent column, political commentator and centrist Democrat  Fareed Zakaria  argues that the current round of progressive policy proposals such as The Green New Deal  and Single Payer Health Care  are the wrong ideas for the Democratic Party. The right ideas, according to Zakaria, are the kinds of "wonky proposals" that centrists have advocated over the last … Continue reading Why Centrist Democrats are Wrong