Those who fail to study of History of Economic thought…

are apparently doomed to repeat old theories as new. I typically save entries on this blog for times when I am able to write an in depth, longer analysis of some issue that has piqued my interest. This entry however will be relatively concise because I see the issues as being rather simple. An article … Continue reading Those who fail to study of History of Economic thought…

Evolutionary Social Theory Chapter Two: Overview

                       Biology and  Evolutionary Social Theory in the early and mid 19th Century While efforts to understand the process of social change during the Enlightenment were envisioned as a form of “social Newtonism”,  evolutionary social theory in the early and mid-19th century increasingly looked to Naturalism as its model science. At the same time, Empiricism, … Continue reading Evolutionary Social Theory Chapter Two: Overview

Evolutionary Social Theory: Chapter One Overview

Chapter One                       Social Newtonism and the Origins of Evolutionary Social Theory Introduction In this chapter I examine the origins of Evolutionary Social Theory and its relationship to Political Economy during the Enlightenment. I argue that social theory during this period can be usefully thought of as “Social Newtonism”, by which I mean the application … Continue reading Evolutionary Social Theory: Chapter One Overview

Introduction to Evolutionary Social Theory

This is the current Introduction to my book, Evolutionary Social Theory which I anticipate will be forthcoming with Routledge within the next year. I anticipate having a completed draft of the study in approximately 3 months. As you may note reading back over this blog, there have been substantial modifications in the scope of this … Continue reading Introduction to Evolutionary Social Theory

The 18.25th Brumaire of Donald Trump

In The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte Marx wrote: Hegel remarks somewhere[*] that all great world-historic facts and personages appear, so to speak, twice. He forgot to add: the first time as tragedy, the second time as farce. Caussidière for Danton, Louis Blanc for Robespierre, the Montagne of 1848 to 1851[66] for the Montagne of … Continue reading The 18.25th Brumaire of Donald Trump

Evolutionary Social Theory: Progress

After a significant amount of additional research and some initial difficulties in actually getting my thoughts down on paper, my book project, Evolutionary Social Theory is now well underway, with two draft chapters essentially complete. I have an official contract with Routledge and I'm working on a two year timeline with a goal of approximately … Continue reading Evolutionary Social Theory: Progress

The Elections: What Lessons Can be learned?

As the results came in on election night, it initially appeared  that Biden had lost the Presidential elections and that the Democratic Party had suffered a disastrous loss. With the votes now mostly counted however, it is clear that the final performance of both Biden and the Party while not the "blowout" anticipated, were also … Continue reading The Elections: What Lessons Can be learned?

Dueling Cancel Cultures

This post was edited to incorporate relevant information which I was not aware of when I first wrote it. This information adds perspective to the issue, but it does not undermine my original argument. Recently, a number of prominent media pundits and academics published a letter  in Harper's Magazine and elsewhere calling for both Justice … Continue reading Dueling Cancel Cultures

Epistemology and COVID 19

In the 20th Century, the philosopher  Karl Popper  drew the boundaries of demarcation between science and pseudoscience in terms of falsification. Exactly what Popper did and did not mean by falsification can be disputed. But the history of the philosophy of science throughout the 20th century has at leats taught us that distinguishing warranted and unwarranted claims … Continue reading Epistemology and COVID 19